Summer in Truckee/Tahoe is essentially summer camp for adults.

From nightly concerts, festivals, holidays, and an ever-streaming parade of party-ready tourists, it’s easy to end up living on the clock that reads Tahoe Time.

Mix what’s on the mountain with the continuously growing list of Reno offerings, and you’ll find there’s always something going on after the lifts stop spinning.

This year, May 17 kicks off one of Reno’s most-attended — and filling — ongoing events: Food Truck Fridays.

Held in Idlewild Park from 4 to 9 p.m. until Sept. 27, the culinary cavalcade often includes more than 35 types of meals-on-wheels, and according to visitrenotahoe.com, it’s one of America’s Top 10 Largest Weekly Food Truck events.

Super-specific honors aside, what’s not to like about food truck fare?

Off the Grid, a food truck industry consultant, stated in its annual report that 2019 will see a 20% surge in food truck business, which hovered around $800 million in 2018.

That’s sooooo many tacos.

The free event includes a host of other activities, such as live music, a climbing wall, and plenty of ways to occupy your children while you sample the goods.

For those skeptical about the quality of a mobile menu, rest assured that much of the industry is made up of high-end chefs who wanted out of the boiler, that is, the commercial restaurant industry.

Creative and hungry to do their own thing, today’s food truck owners are driven to provide patrons with unique, varied tastes from around the globe, as well as old-school Americana favorites that simply wouldn’t taste the same unless served through a window in a flimsy paper canoe.

Reno’s Food Truck Friday list includes Aloha Shack’s Hawaiian Asian fusion; Tortugas, which fires up hatch green chili comfort food; Codfather’s fish and chips; the Tex-Mex of Burnt Orange Truck; Carlito’s calle tacos; Stix & Strip’s chicken selections; plus a full platter of other tasty street eats.

There’s beer and mixed-drink options, vendor displays, and a whole lot of culinary revelry in general. Counterculturist Anthony Bourdain was not shy about his love for food cooked curbside. In the acerbic delivery that defined his rise to fame, Bourdain once said, “There is nothing more vital to a city and a city’s health than good street food, and more of it.”

Clearly Reno heard the late chef’s message, and so have its residents.

Is that summer we smell?